Video: Bodypaint dancers at Zomerfolk – Celtic Music – Butterfly – Kid on the Mountain

The 6th edition of the Rapalje Zomerfolk Festival was fantastic!

Thanks to everyone who made this possible like our wonderful volunteers, exhibitors, caterers, artists, family, friends and of course you, our visitors. We’d love to see everyone back on June 15th & 16th 2019!

Continue reading “Video: Bodypaint dancers at Zomerfolk – Celtic Music – Butterfly – Kid on the Mountain”

Video: The Encore at Castlefest – Loch Lomond – Kweenie Set – Flatlands

Imagine yourself in a completely different world at Castlefest world music festival

The Fantasy festival of light in the Netherlands. A fest for young and old, where, as soon as you enter the gates, you find yourself in the Other World. Castlefest is a total experience with lots of music, fantasy writers, themed catering, medieval crafts and a large market which offers everything a fantasy fan is looking for.

Castlefest characterizes itself by a unique ambiance. This makes that regular visitors are looking forward to the next edition a year in advance. It creates a feeling where you find yourself in a completely different world, causing a daze and homesickness for weeks after the event took place.

Continue reading “Video: The Encore at Castlefest – Loch Lomond – Kweenie Set – Flatlands”

Video: “I’m Into Folk” from Bart Peeters, The Radios

Bart Peeters komt op de proppen met I’m into folk.

Tijdens een optreden van The Pogues op Pinkpop had Bart Peeters gezien hoe een duidelijk door de folk geïnspireerde groep als The Pogues het publiek kon begeesteren, beter nog dan de Red Hot Chili Peppers. Als het mij nu eens zou lukken, dacht Bart, al die folkclichés in één liedje te vatten. Hij ging op zoek naar een geschikt doordeweeks riedeltje op zijn gitaar, zo eentje, of het nu folk is, of flamenco of wat dan ook, dat vlot in het gehoor ligt. Daarmee zou de song moeten beginnen en dan zouden de clichés de revue mogen passeren. I’m into folk moest , dat wou Bart , cabaretesk klinken, grotesk zelfs. Het nummer werd uiteindelijk een pastiche, een doelbewuste slechte nabootsing van de oerdegelijke Ierse folkmuziek. Begin 1989 geraakten The Radios met I’m into folk tot in de staart van de BRT Top 30

Continue reading “Video: “I’m Into Folk” from Bart Peeters, The Radios”

Video: “Heart of Steel” Our, for now at least, last video in this series!

Oh no! We have come to our, for now at least, last video in this series!

But don’t feel sad; you can rewatch all videos as often as you want.

And of course we are ending this series with one of our, and I hope one of your, favorite songs: ‘Heart of Steel’. Enjoy!

Yours, Dieb

Continue reading “Video: “Heart of Steel” Our, for now at least, last video in this series!”

Video: In de stad Amsterdam – Translated from French to Dutch

“Amsterdam” is a song by Jacques Brel. It combines a powerful melancholic crescendo with a rich poetic account of the exploits of sailors on shore leave in Amsterdam.

Brel never recorded this for a studio album, and his only version was released on the live album Enregistrement Public à l’Olympia 1964. Despite this, it has been one of his most enduringly popular works.It was one of the songs Mort Shuman translated into English for the musical Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris.

Brel worked on the song at his house overlooking the Mediterranean at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, the house he shared with Sylvie Rivet, a publicist for Philips; a place she had introduced him to in 1960. “It was the ideal place for him to create, and to indulge his passion for boats and planes. One morning at six o’clock he read the words of Amsterdam to Fernand, a restaurateur who was about to set off fishing for scorpion fish and conger eels for the bouillabaisse. Overcome, Fernand broke out in sobs and cut open some sea urchins to help control his emotion.

Originally the song was situated in Antwerp, but moved to Amsterdam as ‘Dans le port D’Anvers’ does not fit the meter. Noteworthy is that in modern Amsterdam there is still a port, but owing to widespread automation and decline in crew sizes, there are far fewer sailors on shore leave.

Continue reading “Video: In de stad Amsterdam – Translated from French to Dutch”

Video: “The Stride” at Dieb’s home

Today we play ‘The Stride’ for you.

This is one of my favorite pieces, because I can play my violin really wild.

Have fun!

Continue reading “Video: “The Stride” at Dieb’s home”

Video: “Stad Amsterdam” at Dieb’s

Time for my personal favourite:

“De Stad Amsterdam”. During this song I can do what I love most: playing as wild as I can on my violin.

I hope you enjoy this as much as I do!

Yours, Dieb

Continue reading “Video: “Stad Amsterdam” at Dieb’s”

Video: “Bog Down in the Valley-o” at Dieb’s

Welcome at my place!

The song we will sing for you now is amazing, but also very difficult: Bog Down in the Valley-o.

Can you sing along?

Yours, Dieb

Continue reading “Video: “Bog Down in the Valley-o” at Dieb’s”

Video: Lord of the Dance

In writing the lyrics to “Lord of the Dance” in 1963,

Sydney Carter was inspired partly by Jesus, but also partly by a statue of the Hindu God Shiva as Nataraja (Shiva’s dancing pose) which sat on his desk, and was partly intending simply to give tribute to Shaker music. He later stated, “I did not think the churches would like it at all. I thought many people would find it pretty far flown, probably heretical and anyway dubiously Christian. But in fact people did sing it and, unknown to me, it touched a chord … Anyway, it’s the sort of Christianity I believe in.”

(Wikipedia)

Continue reading “Video: Lord of the Dance”

Video: Willliam’s Favourite

One Jig and two reels: “The Blarney Pilgrim”, “Father Kelly” & “Pinch of Snuff”

“The Blarney Pilgrim”:This jig is a popular tune at Irish sessions. It seems to be especially popular under fiddle players, but is equally nice to play on tin whistle or any other instrument. The title of this jig is referring to The Blarney stone, a block of limestone built into the walls of Blarney Castle, located close to Cork, Ireland. The legend goes that kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of the gab, meaning giving the ability to speak freely and in a way people want to listen to you and believe you. The stone attracts people from all over the world.

“Father Kelly’s Reel” in G is yet another tune that is played in sessions around the globe. Father P. J. Kelly (1926 – March 25, 2006) named this tune “The Rossmore Jetty” after the pier on the river Shannon near his hometown of Woodford in East Galway. This tune is also called “Father Kelly’s #1.” He was an accordionist, composer, and missionary in Fiji, Australia and Pakistan.

“Pinch of Snuff”: Known as a northern Irish reel, and especially one from County Donegal where it is particularly popular. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) recounts the origins of the tune in the faerie folklore of Donegal (Seamus Ennis appears to have told the same story). It seems that the fairies were trying to abduct a bride at a wedding in the Teelin, southwest Donegal, area by trying to trick her into uttering the magic words which would bind her to them and seal her fate. As luck would have it, hiding in the rafters was a young man who had been her suitor, but whom had lost in the bid for her hand. He saw what was about to happen to his still-beloved (who was dancing below), and from his high hiding place he thought to shake down some snuff upon her. The bride breathed it in, sneezed, and was greeted with a polite chorus of “Dia agus Muire dhuit” (God and Mary bless you) from members of the wedding party. This was anathema to the fairies, who took flight. The tune the fiddlers were playing while the bride was dancing at the time of her rescue was dubbed “The Pinch of Snuff.”

Continue reading “Video: Willliam’s Favourite”