Video: Mrs. McCloud Irish reel

“Miss MacLeod” was popular as long ago as 1779 in Ireland

as its playing is mentioned in an account by a foreign visitor named Berringer or Beranger of a “cake” dance (i.e. where the prize was a cake) he participated in while visiting in Connacht. O’Neill (1913) relates Beranger’s observations somewhat differently and gives that it was one of six tunes played by Galway pipers in 1779 for the entertainment of the traveler. Irish violinist R.M. Levey includes the reel (as “Miss M’Cloud”) in his first collection of Irish dance tunes (1858), but notes its Irish provenance is “doubtful.” In modern times in Ireland the tune was included in a famous set of the late Donegal fiddlers, brothers Mickey and John Doherty, who played it as the last tune after “Enniskillen Dragoon” and “Nora Chrionna” (Wise Nora), though sometimes they substituted “Piper of Keadue (The)” for “Miss McLeod’s.” The whole set was played in the rare AAae tuning, which required playing in position (Caoimhin MacAoidh). See also “Foxhunter’s Reel” and “Grey Plover” for a related tunes in O’Neill. (Wikipedia)

Also known as Dance For Your Daddy My Little Laddie, Did You Ever Meet The Devil, Uncle Joe?, The Dun Cow, Eighthsome, Hop High Ladies, Iníon Mhic Leóid, May Day, McCleod’s, McCloud’s, McLeod’s, Miss MacLeod, Miss McCleod, Miss McCleod’s, Miss McCloud, Miss McCloud’s, Miss McLeod, Miss McLeod’s, Mrs MacLeod Of Raasay, Mrs Mc Leod’s, Mrs Mcleod Of Raasay, Mrs McLeod’s, Mrs McLeods, Mrs. MacLeod’s, Mrs. Mc Cloud, Mrs. McCloud, Mrs. McCloud’s, Mrs. McClouds, Mrs. McLeod, Mrs. McLeod Of Rasay, Mrs. McLeod’s, Mrs. McLeods, Ms McCloud’s, Old Mammy Knickerbocker, Uncle Joe’s.

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Video: “Bog Down in the Valley-o” at Dieb’s

Welcome at my place!

The song we will sing for you now is amazing, but also very difficult: Bog Down in the Valley-o.

Can you sing along?

Yours, Dieb

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Video: Willliam’s Favourite

One Jig and two reels: “The Blarney Pilgrim”, “Father Kelly” & “Pinch of Snuff”

“The Blarney Pilgrim”:This jig is a popular tune at Irish sessions. It seems to be especially popular under fiddle players, but is equally nice to play on tin whistle or any other instrument. The title of this jig is referring to The Blarney stone, a block of limestone built into the walls of Blarney Castle, located close to Cork, Ireland. The legend goes that kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of the gab, meaning giving the ability to speak freely and in a way people want to listen to you and believe you. The stone attracts people from all over the world.

“Father Kelly’s Reel” in G is yet another tune that is played in sessions around the globe. Father P. J. Kelly (1926 – March 25, 2006) named this tune “The Rossmore Jetty” after the pier on the river Shannon near his hometown of Woodford in East Galway. This tune is also called “Father Kelly’s #1.” He was an accordionist, composer, and missionary in Fiji, Australia and Pakistan.

“Pinch of Snuff”: Known as a northern Irish reel, and especially one from County Donegal where it is particularly popular. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) recounts the origins of the tune in the faerie folklore of Donegal (Seamus Ennis appears to have told the same story). It seems that the fairies were trying to abduct a bride at a wedding in the Teelin, southwest Donegal, area by trying to trick her into uttering the magic words which would bind her to them and seal her fate. As luck would have it, hiding in the rafters was a young man who had been her suitor, but whom had lost in the bid for her hand. He saw what was about to happen to his still-beloved (who was dancing below), and from his high hiding place he thought to shake down some snuff upon her. The bride breathed it in, sneezed, and was greeted with a polite chorus of “Dia agus Muire dhuit” (God and Mary bless you) from members of the wedding party. This was anathema to the fairies, who took flight. The tune the fiddlers were playing while the bride was dancing at the time of her rescue was dubbed “The Pinch of Snuff.”

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Video: Do you want to see Rapalje near you?

At our Rapalje office we plan and organize all Rapalje shows as well as the Rapalje Zomerfolk Festival.

Do you know of any good venues or festivals near you, where we could perform? Please let us know by replying to this video!

Yours, David

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Video: “Drunken Sailor” – Sea Shanty

“Drunken Sailor” is a sea shanty, also known as “What Shall We Do with a/the Drunken Sailor?”

The shanty was sung to accompany certain work tasks aboard sailing ships, especially those that required a bright walking pace. It is believed to originate in the early 19th century or before, during a period when ships’ crews, especially those of military vessels, were large enough to permit hauling a rope whilst simply marching along the deck. With the advent of merchant packet and clipper ships and their smaller crews, which required different working methods, use of the shanty appears to have declined or shifted to other, minor tasks.
“Drunken Sailor” was revived as a popular song among non-sailors in the 20th century, and grew to become one of the best-known songs of the shanty repertoire among mainstream audiences. It has been performed and recorded by many musical artists and appeared in many popular media.
Although the song’s lyrics vary, they usually contain some variant of the question, “What shall we do with a drunken sailor, early in the morning?”
In some styles of performance, each successive verse suggests a method of sobering or punishing the drunken sailor. In other styles, further questions are asked and answered about different people.

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Video: “Dunmore Lassies” at David’s

The last song in my garden

“Dunmore Lassies” is played on the “Low Whistle”: mysterious and one of my favourites!

I think the atmosphere goes very well with this song.

Yours, David

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Video: Jock Stewart – Scottish folk song

I’m a man you won’t meet every day!

So be easy and free..

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Video: “March of King Laois” at David’s

My bagpipes are finally on fire!

It’s always exciting to do this and so much fun.

The next tune: “March of King Laois” is a slow march

When I started with Rapalje. we always spoke about a burning bagpipes

And with this song we build one with my neighbour from “Brons Motoren”. He helped me to get the things together. And, yeah, we did it!

We can not do it here inside. That’s why we’re going to our garden

And hopefully you enjoy the burning bagpipes!

 

Yours, David

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Video: The King of the Fairies

Also known as Bonny Charlie, Dance Of Love, The Fairies Selection,

Gradh Mo Chroidhe Do Shean Wig, King O’ The Fairies, King Of Fairies, King Of The Faeries, The King Of The Faeries, King Of The Fairies March, The King Of The Fairies, King William, King William Of Orange, King William’s, Prince William Of Orange, Rí Na Sideog, Set Dance, Setdance, Your Old Wig Is The Love Of My Heart.

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Video: “Loch Lomond” at David’s

Slowly darkness falls over my garden and the torches are lit.

From my balcony I watch until I can play.

“Loch Lomond” is a well-known Scottish traditional. We play it also, with our torches and the bagpipes

After the song we play “Farewell to the Creeks”. It’s standing in “The Scottish Guards”. It’s also a traditional Scottish tune.

We can not do it here inside. So we’re going back to the garden

Have fun watching this video! “Loch Lomond” at David’s

So, enjoy!, David

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